Aquion Energy: Saltwater Batteries

aquion

Sustainability Problem

Too many energy sources are currently dirty and expensive. With the growing renewable energy sector, we need a way to decrease the strain on the grid and make solar dispatchable.

 

Technology

Aquion’s sodium-ion batteries provide a low-cost way to store large amounts of energy through thousands of battery cycles (the batteries can deliver a round-trip efficiency of 85 percent and perform 5,000 cycles), and a non-toxic end product made from widely available material inputs and which operates safely and reliably across a wide range of temperatures and operating environments

How the technology works: Aqueous Hybrid Ion (AHI) chemistry is composed of a saltwater electrolyte, manganese oxide cathode, carbon titanium phosphate composite anode, and synthetic cotton separator. The battery utilizes non-corrosive intercalation reactions at the anode and cathode.

Compared to other solar storage technologies:

tech

 

Stakeholders

  • Solar companies
  • Utilities
  • Solar producers (homeowners/businesses)
  • Battery manufacturers

 

Steps to implementation

  • Obtain more funding for research and marketing
  • Outreach to businesses who would like to partner and create pilot programs
  • Create plan to scale to homeowners

 

Sources

http://aquionenergy.com/technology/deep-cycle-battery/

http://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/Aquion-Energy-Continues-Funding-Momentum-With-a-33M-Round-For-Its-New-Batt

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Aquion Energy: Saltwater Batteries

  1. This is interesting! I come from a country that is actually an archipelago of over 7,000 islands so there’s plenty of salt water to go around! This can be helpful to a lot of people.

    Like

  2. Energy storage is going to be vital to the renewable energy build up, especially if we have targets of 50% by 2030. One of the major drawbacks of current storage options, besides the cost, is the toxicity of the batteries. Having this saline solution, or other bio-options, will open a whole new option for a better “green” storage option. Hopefully they can ramp this technology up quickly and drive down the cost per kWh in order to capture the recent growth in storage.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s