Elevated bike path concept to fight congestion

Sustainability problem: Traffic congestion and pollution

Traffic congestion and the amount of emissions that result from it are an increasingly severe problem in today’s growing megacities.

Technology solution: 

  • BMV proposes a network of bike lanes above street level, called E3 Way for elevated, electric and efficient, to help megacities fight traffic congestion and reduce emissions by making cycling safer and more convenient.
  • The network would be exclusive for electric bikes and two-wheelers, and it would have a speed limit of 15.5 mph. It would also have ramps and sluice systems to handle merging.
  • Cameras would be used to monitor the flow of traffic with the help of AI, and most of the lanes would have a roof to facilitate its use during rainy days.
  • The concept is said to have a modular design, making it suitable to use in any megacity and relatively economical to build.

Organizational stakeholders

  • Local city government
  • Department of transportation
  • Cycling advocates
  • Environmental department
  • Bicycle ride-sharing companies

Implementation steps

  1. Flexibilize the concept to allow for non-electric bikes to use the network.
  2. Partner with a bike-intense city to generate a localized project that solves a specific problem
  3. Implement the solution and expand the concept to other cities

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Comment: Smart Parking Meters

“The article mentions that the Park Smarter App also facilitates the process of paying for parking with the help of single sign-on and integration with services like Visa Checkout.”

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3 thoughts on “Elevated bike path concept to fight congestion

  1. This is an interesting concept that has been adopted in the past for buses and light rail congestion in some cities. I’m not certain what the data suggested concerning its success or failure, but it seems like a good solution.

    #oaf2118

    Like

  2. I like the idea conceptually, but I’m even more excited about rethinking how we use the current road inventory and make it inviting and safe for all users, especially bicyclists. Keeping them separated on elevated tracks is appealing from a safety standpoint, but still gives all priority to autos on roads, which is known to be inefficient for the city as a whole.

    Like

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