Desalination 2.0

Water independence and source reliability is a very pressing issue that many communities are facing today. One of the many solutions that is being adopted today is to build desalination plants to turn sea water into drinkable water. However, building these plants and the process that is desalination can be very expensive. An average desalination plant can cost up to a billion dollars.

A new technology that could ensure cheaper desalination would be Advanced Water Recovery.

-Uses chemicals to turn salt water into drinking water and then, through proprietary process, filters the chemicals back out.

-Costs 70% less than current technologies used for desalination

-A demonstration plant is currently being built in Pennsylvania, cleaning the water used in the fracking process.

Organizational stakeholders that would need this technology would be American states that are looking to become water independent, such as California that is currently looking to build a second desalination plant, that would cost the state millions. The upcoming plant has caused a debate over the real need for such expensive technology for water production.

To deploy the technology, the firm would list and present the advantages this technology has over traditional  desalination plants (safer for marine life, cheaper), to the state government and officials who would authorize this technology to be widely used. Once their demonstration plant is complete, these officials will be able to see and experience first hand what they could be enjoying in their own state.

Link: http://money.cnn.com/2015/06/02/technology/water-cleaning-technology/index.html

Link to comment: https://makeasmartcity.com/2017/11/27/light-manipulating-algae-could-boost-solar-power-technology/comment-page-1/#comment-1518

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One thought on “Desalination 2.0

  1. This is a pretty cool technology.
    If the demonstration plant is successful, and water purity and safety are at potable water standards, I can see how places like Singapore that have very limited fresh water availability would incorporate this solution into their water infrastructure.

    Like

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