Biofuel made from CO2 and Sunlight

  1. Sustainability Problem

Energy: Climate change calls for the need to lessen our carbon footprint. One such way to do so is through biofuels. Biofuels are significantly cleaner than their petroleum alternatives, producing much less CO2 emissions. As a result, innovative ways to produce biofuels is needed to combat climate change.

Source: http://www.sunthenoil.com/index_files/Page327.htm

  1. Technology

Article: Joule says “will go commercial in 2017”: solar fuels on the way  

By Jim Lane

Link: http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2015/03/23/joule-says-will-go-commercial-in-2017-solar-fuels-on-the-way/

  • Joule’s Unlimited’s biofuel is called helioculture, which is a modified cyanobacteria that takes in CO2, sunlight, and some nutrients to produce transportation fuel
  • The fuel produced costs roughly the same price as digging up petroleum
  • The company’s technology’s platform does not require arable land suitable for crop cultivation or potable water, which ensures the company not to compete with food production
  1. Organizational Stakeholders
  • Joule Unlimited
  • Investors
  • General Public
  • Coalition of industrialization partners
  1. Implementation
  • Joule Unlimited closed a $40 million round of financing, to expand its plant in Hobbs, New Mexico to commercial scale by 2017
  • The company plans to establish a coalition of industrialization partners to accelerate the development of carbon-neutral fuels at large scale
  • The ultimate goal is to convert 150,000 tons of waste CO2 into 25 million gallons of ethanol per year at the facility

Source: http://cleantechnica.com/2015/05/12/buh-bye-corn-ethanol-joule-makes-thing-recycled-co2/

Cycling your way into Everyday Life

Picture1

Problem:

Rural population in developing nations often lack of access to energy and mores specifically electricity. This lowers their level of life, and pushes them to consume energy with hi emissions, that results in health problems such a wood burning.

Technology:

Maya pedal is an NGO located in Guatemala las builds and distributes machines based on reused bicycles in order for the people to perform everyday activities with their own energy. Blender, Water Pump, Nut-Sheller, Coffee Depulper, and Metal Sharpener, are just a few examples of the big range of models they have to offer.

Stakeholders:

  • Local population.
  • National, state and local governments governments.
  • NGOs

Process:

The model has to be scaled up in Guatemala and to other countries. The implementation is not that hard because the machines can be created by the population, but they do need technical assistance to read and follow the manuals. For this to happen, a partnership with other local NGO´s could be useful to expand the network.

http://www.mayapedal.org/machines.en

Digital Printing: A Possible Revolution for Dyeing Textiles

digital printing

Problem: Textile Waste and Water Use Caused by Fabric Dying  

Traditionally dying textiles causes a number of environmental problems like excessive use of water and landfill overspill due to textile waste.

Technology: 10 awesome innovations changing the future of fashion10 awesome innovations changing the future of fashion” by Melissa Breyer

One technology, digital printing, implemented by Huntsman Textile Effects, uses a process in which prints are directly applied to fabrics with printers, reducing 95% the use of water, 75% the use of energy, and reducing fabric waste. Huntsman does this with a variety of different inks like acid ink, disperse ink, pigment ink and reactive dyes, all of which use cutting-edge technology to create more sustainable products.

Stakeholders:

Huntsman tech engineers/designers

Technological partners

Investors

Fashion designers

Clothing retailers

Customers

Implementation:

In order to implement this technology on a large-scale, a number of investors need to be introduced

Huntsman is worldwide big company, however, it only manufactures in China, Germany, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Thailand. It must be introduced to the US market and other other European countries that have a big influence in the fashion industry.

Fashion designers must begin to use the technology to introduce the innovation to the public and encourage its usage down the supply chain i.e. factories and low-end designers/retailers. For example, it has already been used by designers like Mary Katrantzou, Alexander McQueen and Basso & Brooke.

Sources:

http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-fashion/10-awesome-innovations-changing-future-fashion.html

http://www.huntsman.com/textile_effects/a/Solutions/Textile%20End%20Use%20Solutions/Digital%20Printing

http://www.huntsman.com/textile_effects/a/About%20Us

Cleaning the air we breathe

Problem:

Pollution is one of the main concerns in the big cities around the world. Countries like the UK, China, and Mexico, among others have struggled with smog through decades, but this problem seems to keep increasing. The problem is that as population grows, and the consumption patterns stay unchanged, it has been virtually impossible to decrease the emissions that cause smog.

Technology:

Ironically, it was in a country that does not suffer from this problem where the first smog filtering tower was created. This 7-meter tower was installed in Rotterdam, and uses filters in its interior to literally inhale polluted air and exhaling bubbles of clean air.Tower

Stakeholders:

  • Local governments of polluted cities.
  • National and state governments where the cities are located.
  • Population in general.

Process:

As mentioned, this is the first installed tower. The creators are hoping to find NGOs or government allies to scale it up. Resources are needed to improve the functioning of the tower aand decreasing their costs, which seems crucial to reach development countries which are the most vulnerable to this problem.

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2015/sep/19/worlds-first-smog-filtering-tower-on-tour-daan-roosegaarde-air-pollution

New technology removes air pollutants, may reduce energy use in animal agricultural facilities

Sustainability Problem:

The increase in pollution has increased the need to produce food to sustain this growth. Growing livestock produces high levels of ammonia concentration in the barns. This has a negative impact on the quality of the air in the vicinity of the farm.

Technology:

  1. Ammonia polluted air enters the biofilter.
  2. There is also a heat exchanger that captures some of the heat and transfers it back into the barn along with fresh air.
  3. The prototype has been proven successful in a farm with 5,000 chickens.

Stakeholders:

  • Farmers
  • People living around farm land

Steps for deployment:

  • Start by deploying technology is farms with more than 5,000 chickens
  • Approach national brands, because they have resources to implement technology

Reference:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120104115057.htm

Fabric Made of Food

qmilk

Problem: Milk Waste 

In Germany every year 1.9 million tons of good milk is disposed of . This waste is costing manufacturers, as well as contributing to food waste and landfill overspill.

Technology: “When Technology Meets Fashion” by Charles Morley

In 2011, German micro-biology student, Anke Domaske, discovered t a way to make textiles out of milk, tea and coffee beans. She then launched Qmilk, which produces fabrics made from 100% biodegradable/renewable materials, mainly raw cow milk. In order to do this “you add the protein powder – it looks like flour – to water and you mix it into a dough. Then there’s a nozzle at the end with teeny tiny holes that put out textile fibres instead of noodles”. Qmilk 1 kg of fiber only needs 5 minutes to produce and max. 2 liters of water, this means it can be more cost efficient as well as produce fewer CO2 emissions. finally, it is naturally antibacterial, which means it can be used for those with sensitive skin or textile allergies.

Stakeholders:

Qmilk tech engineers/designers

Technological partners

Investors

Fashion designers

Clothing retailers

Customers

Implementation:

In order to implement this technology on a large-scale, a number of investors need to be introduced

Qmilk is a small company, based in Germany. In order to spread the technology, it must be introduced to the US market and other European countries that have a big influence in the fashion industry.

Fashion designers must begin to use the technology to introduce the innovation to the public and encourage its usage down the supply chain i.e. factories and low-end designers/retailers.

Sources:

When Technology Meets Sustainable Fashion

http://de.qmilk.eu/presite/index_en.html

https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/sour-milk-fibres-textiles-qmilk

 

Smart Tailoring

smart tailoring

Problem: Textile Waste

Textile waste is a major issue in the fashion industry, leading to increased waste material and cluttered landfills, not to mention wasted time, energy and money.

Technology: “10 awesome innovations changing the future of fashion” by Melissa Breyer

A new technology produced by Indian designer, Siddhartha Upadhyaya, called the Direct Panel on Loom (DPOL), also referred to as Smart Tailoring, is way to increase fabric efficiency by up to 15%. It can also reduce lead time by 50%. “By using a computer attached to a loom, data such as color, pattern and size related to the garment is entered, and the loom cranks out the exact pieces — which then just need to be constructed.” With this technology, weaving, fabric cutting, and patterning happen all at once. This process ends up minimizing fabric waste and saves energy and water by 70-80%.

Stakeholders:

Smart Tailoring tech engineers/designers

Technological partners

Investors

Fashion designers

Clothing retailers

Customers

Implementation:

In order to implement this technology on a large-scale, a number of investors need to be introduced

Smart Tailoring should start a campaign marketing the technology to both low-end and high-end textile suppliers, proving that the process could be cheaper in general, save the company money, time and energy

Fashion designers must begin to use the technology to introduce the innovation to the public and encourage its usage down the supply chain i.e. factories and low-end designers/retailers.

Sources:

http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-fashion/10-awesome-innovations-changing-future-fashion.html

http://www.treehugger.com/style/high-tech-meets-low-waste-in-new-computer-generated-eco-fashion.html