Toys from plant-based plastic by Bioserie

Sustainability problem

bioplastics

Most toys are made from fossil-fuel based plastics. There is uncertainty whether such products can have negative health effects on babies and children. Styrenes, phthalate, BPA and PVC are well known health offenders. Some of these substances can become hormone disruptors that are linked too reproductive and birth problems as well as carcinogens. Toys that are advertised as “BPA-Free”, “PVC-Free” etc, can still contain petrochemicals harmful to health. Additionally, there is an increasing interest and demand for lower carbon footprint products.

Bioserie toys provide an innovative answer for those who search for aesthetically pleasing products while maintaining their children and the environment’s health.

Technology

  • Bioserie is the world’s first to produce its toys from purely plant based plastics and materials. It uses a blend of polylactic acids without petrochemical additives. Their product is certified by the Department of Agriculture’s BioPreferred program to be 100% bio-based.
  • Modifiers are used to ensure the product to be non brittle and heat resistant. The company has focused its R&D on improved resistance and durability.
  • The coloring material are also based on sustainable raw materials specially developed for biopolymers. It Meets global industry and composting standards.

 

Stakeholders

  • Costumers (Most likely parents)
  • Toy stores/ distributors
  • Investors
  • The company
  • Environmental & health NGOs

 

Implementation

  • Bioserie and NGOs should market to parents the dangers of oil based toys and promote the comparative benefits of plant based plastic toys.
  • NGOs should pressure toy stores and toy distributors to supply more products made out of safer materials such as Bioserie’s plant-based plastic.
  • Bioserie should manage their relation networks of potential investors in order to gain more capital to further enhance the quality, design and marketing of their product.

 

Reference

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/bioserie-bioplastic-baby-toys-made-of-plants#/

http://www.plasticsnews.com/article/20140613/NEWS/140619946/turning-bioplastics-into-childs-play

http://www.bioserie.com/bioplastics.html

 

 

Impossible Foods: Plant-based burgers with taste and texture of the real thing

Screen Shot 2016-06-06 at 2.52.07 PM

Sustainability Problem:

Animal agriculture contributes to nearly ⅕ of all GHG emissions worldwide and beef production is considered the worst offender when it comes to its environmental impact. A 2014 study found that compared to pork or chicken, beef production requires 28x more land use, 11x more water use and produces 5x more GHG emissions. Cutting back or eliminating beef consumption would have a positive environmental impact. However, many people enjoy the taste of beef and aren’t interested in pursuing a completely meat-free or plant-based lifestyle. The current plant-based meat substitutes in the marketplace, do not replace the void of a “real” burger when it comes to taste and texture.

Technology:

Impossible Foods aimed to create plant-based meat and dairy products that have the taste and texture of real animal-based products that are healthier for the consumer and are less harmful to the planet using less energy, water and other resources compared to animal products. Over three years of research into what makes the process of cooking and eating meat so unique led to the discovery of the molecule heme which gives meat its distinct taste and smell. This molecule is also found in plants and therefore Impossible Foods set out to develop the right combination of plant-based ingredients on a molecular level to mimic the taste and texture of a real beef burger. Operated as a tech firm and not a typical food company, Impossible Foods is based in Redwood City, CA was founded by Stanford biochemist Pat Brown whose premise is that food production is reliant on technology. Impossible Foods has raised $182 million and received a $300 million buyout offer from Google, which they passed on.

Technology Stakeholders:

  • Chefs, restaurateurs, food retailers
  • Consumers of beef burgers
  • Scientists
  • Engineers
  • Farmers
  • Investors

Technology Implementation:

Impossible Foods plans to officially launch their first product the Impossible Burger in July 2016 in select restaurants in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and NYC. They are currently partnering with select chefs to gain awareness and interest in the food space and have held tastings at tech conferences such as Code Conference. Future expansion plans include plant-based dairy products. To better address the sustainability problem of beef consumption, Impossible Foods should scale production to have products in retail markets with a wider U.S. or even worldwide distribution.

Update August 10, 2016: The Impossible Burger is now available in NYC at Momofuku Nishi. https://nishi.momofuku.com/

I tried it today and was impressed. As a former burger-lover who went plant-based earlier this year, it did fill a void. It did taste like a beef burger and I would probably try it again.

burger

 

 

Sources:

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jun/02/impossible-foods-plant-burger-taste-test

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/21/beef-environmental-impact_n_5599370.html

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jul/21/giving-up-beef-reduce-carbon-footprint-more-than-cars

http://www.gfi.org/impossible-foods-launches-the-impossible

http://www.economist.com/news/technology-quarterly/21645497-tech-startups-are-moving-food-business-make-sustainable-versions-meat

http://www.impossiblefoods.com/

 

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