Edible Spoons??

  1. Sustainability problem (Primarily Waste, but also addresses Water and Health):

It is no surprise that we generate a lot of waste in this day and age. Of that waste, “40 million tons of reusable plastic cutlery get thrown out every year, most of them after a single use.” It also takes a long time for plastic to break down (up to 1,000 years) and plastic has been found to contain toxins that pose risks to the environment and to humans.

(more information about plastic about be found here: https://myplasticfreelife.com/2007/07/whats-wrong-with-plastic-anyway/)

  1. Edible Cutlery can help the problem:
    • Bakey’s Edible Cutlery can help achieve zero waste by eliminating plastic cutlery
    • If you don’t want to eat it, the product can degrade naturally in less than 3 days
    • No exposure to toxins associated with plastics since the edible cutlery is 100% natural made of flour with no added chemicals or preservatives
    • Product is made of millets, which will encourage farmers to grow this crop instead of rice, which consumes 60 times more water than millets

Sources:

  1. Stakeholders:
    • All restaurants, but especially fast food/fast casual restaurants where plastic cutlery is more common
    • General consumers
  1. Next Steps:
    • Establish a trial group of sustainability-conscious restaurants willing to replace plastic cutlery with Bakey’s for a limited amount of time
    • When successful, use case study to convert additional restaurants into Bakey’s users
    • After establishing a degree of product recognition by consumers, improve website to better tell the company’s story and explain the benefits of edible cutlery

Columbia UNI: Lc3291

 

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Biodegradable Eco-bags

  1. Sustainability Problem: Waste is a recurring problem that has persisted through decades of innovation towards unnatural manufacturing and processes. Delving deeper, plastic waste is a big issue because they do not degrade easily. It can take hundreds of years for plastic to break down. With an estimated worldwide consumption of 1 trillion plastic bags every year, a better solution is needed.
  2. AVANI Bio-Cassava Bag could be the solution:
    • 100% biodegradable, compostable and disposable – degrades within 90 days
    • Made from cassava starch and all-natural resins, 100% renewable – contains no conventional plastic
    • Safe for consumption – dissolves in lukewarm water
    • Can be recycled along with paper
    • Durable – look, feel and perform like plastic

Sources:

BIO-CASSAVA BAG | Avani Eco

http://www.avanieco.com/product/eco-bags

Plastic you can drink: A solution for pollution? | CNN

http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/16/world/cassava-plastic/index.html

Cassava carrier bags: Indonesian entrepreneur tackles plastic scourge

https://phys.org/news/2017-02-cassava-carrier-bags-indonesian-entrepreneur.html

#IAMNOTPLASTIC

  1. Stakeholders:
    • Supermarkets, grocery shops
    • Retailers
    • Hospitality industries
    • Food & Beverage industries
    • Consumers all over the world
    • Waste Management Facilities
  2. Next steps:
    • Invest more on advertising and outreach
    • Mass production could be a significant progress
    • Innovate further by introducing new products/alternatives and concepts

 

By: Timothy Wiranata

Columbia UNI: tw2618

Conceptos Plasticos (Plastic Concepts)

Sustainability Problem:

This technology is addressing plastic waste pollution, by transforming used plastic into bricks. Plastic can take up to 500 years to biodegrade and 75% of plastic produced globally is in a landfill or not formally disposed of.

Technology:

  • The industrial process is called extrusion
  • Uses a multilayered plastics, mixtures of different plastics and rubber to make a quality construction material
  • The bricks are shaped into pieces that interlock with each other making the pieces connect like a puzzle.

Stakeholders:

  • Government
  • Waste Management Facilities
  • People without homes

How to deploy this technology:

  • Estimate cost of extrusion process
  • Estimate amount of plastic needed
  • Involve Waste Management Facilities

References:

Oscar Mendes The man who  provides decent housing for the homeless while reducing waste plastic.

 

 

Toys from plant-based plastic by Bioserie

Sustainability problem

bioplastics

Most toys are made from fossil-fuel based plastics. There is uncertainty whether such products can have negative health effects on babies and children. Styrenes, phthalate, BPA and PVC are well known health offenders. Some of these substances can become hormone disruptors that are linked too reproductive and birth problems as well as carcinogens. Toys that are advertised as “BPA-Free”, “PVC-Free” etc, can still contain petrochemicals harmful to health. Additionally, there is an increasing interest and demand for lower carbon footprint products.

Bioserie toys provide an innovative answer for those who search for aesthetically pleasing products while maintaining their children and the environment’s health.

Technology

  • Bioserie is the world’s first to produce its toys from purely plant based plastics and materials. It uses a blend of polylactic acids without petrochemical additives. Their product is certified by the Department of Agriculture’s BioPreferred program to be 100% bio-based.
  • Modifiers are used to ensure the product to be non brittle and heat resistant. The company has focused its R&D on improved resistance and durability.
  • The coloring material are also based on sustainable raw materials specially developed for biopolymers. It Meets global industry and composting standards.

 

Stakeholders

  • Costumers (Most likely parents)
  • Toy stores/ distributors
  • Investors
  • The company
  • Environmental & health NGOs

 

Implementation

  • Bioserie and NGOs should market to parents the dangers of oil based toys and promote the comparative benefits of plant based plastic toys.
  • NGOs should pressure toy stores and toy distributors to supply more products made out of safer materials such as Bioserie’s plant-based plastic.
  • Bioserie should manage their relation networks of potential investors in order to gain more capital to further enhance the quality, design and marketing of their product.

 

Reference

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/bioserie-bioplastic-baby-toys-made-of-plants#/

http://www.plasticsnews.com/article/20140613/NEWS/140619946/turning-bioplastics-into-childs-play

http://www.bioserie.com/bioplastics.html

 

 

Denim Made out of Ocean Plastic

Bionic_Yarn_Pharrell_G_Star_Raw_For_The_Oceans_Denim_Recycle_Plastic_Sustainable_Principles_CFADC_Superego_Clothiers_3_grande

Problem: Plastics in the Oceans

Today, the Earth’s oceans are littered with millions of tons of plastic, wreaking havoc on animal and plant life in the water. This does not only affect the wildlife, but humans who rely on them for food and or business

Technology: “How a Pair of Jeans Could Save our Planet’s Plastic-Choked Oceans” by Issie Lapowsky

New York City-based startup, Bionic Yarn, has created a way to make fabric from recycled ocean plastic and turn it into denim products. The products are woven with some nine tons of ocean plastic inside. One of the company’s yarns is FLX, which is is made completely of recovered plastic. Their patented technology heats and spins together dozens of RPET strands to make new and improved yarn

Stakeholders:

Bionic Yarn tech engineers/designers

Technological partners

Design Collaborators

Fashion designers

Clothing retailers

Customers

Implementation:

In order to implement this technology on a large-scale, a number of investors need to be introduced

Fashion designers must begin to use the technology to introduce the innovation to the public and encourage its usage down the supply chain i.e. factories and low-end designers/retailers.  For example, Bionic Yarn has partnered with celebrity/designer, Pharrell Williams, who uses it in his G-Star Raw collections

The company should start a campaign marketing the technology to high-end textile suppliers, proving that this material can be recycled and high quality

Sources:

http://www.wired.com/2014/08/bionic-yarns/

http://www.bionicyarn.com/

https://www.g-star.com/en_us

 

 

 

AIRCARBON: PLASTIC FROM THIN AIR

1. Sustainability Problem

  • Humans produce 660 billion pounds of plastic a year, and the manufacturing process creates three times as much carbon dioxide by weight as actual plastic.
  • Plastic is mostly made of crude oil, which is collected mainly by fracking in the US. Fracking is associated with water pollution, earthquakes in non-sismic areas, and methane emissions.
  • Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the primary greenhouse gas emitted through human activities. In 2014, CO2 accounted for about 80.9% of all U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from human activities.

Issues: Air Pollution, Carbon Dioxide emissions, Petroleum consumption, Fracking

 

2. Technology 

Typically, plastic is made by exposing hydro­carbons from fossil fuels to tremendous pressure and energy. Newlight’s first commercial plant, in California, captures methane generated by a dairy farm’s waste lagoon and transports it to a bioreactor. There, enzymes combine the gas with air to form a polymer. The resulting plastic, called AirCarbon, performs identically to most oil-based plastics but costs less—creating a market-­driven solution to global warming.

AirCarbon is able to meet the performance requirements of a wide range of applications, including applications currently using fossil fuel-based polypropylene, polyethylene, ABS, polystyrene, and TPU. AirCarbon™ can be used in extrusion, blown film, cast film, thermoforming, fiber spinning, and injection molding applications. For more information about specific functional properties, please contact Newlight.

Companies have already signed on to use AirCarbon in their products, including KI desk chairs (pictured), Dell computer packaging, and Sprint smartphone cases.

 

3. Stakeholders

  • Newlight Technologies (owner of the technologies)
  • Companies making plastic-based products
  • Policy-makers to promote the use of AirCarbon
  • Environmental NGOs to require policy-makers to demand sustainable plastic production processes.

 

4. Implementation Process

Founded in 2003, after 10 years of research, Newlight has developed, patented, and commercialized the world’s first commercially-scaled carbon capture technology able to produce high-performance thermoplastics from air and methane emissions that can match the performance of oil-based plastics and out-compete on price.

The company has already won several sustainability awards, as well as attended many environment and sustainability summits in order to spread the word and raise awareness. The list is too large to appear in this text but can be found here: http://newlight.com/news/

 

5. Sources:

The Seabin: a new ocean cleaning techology

The problem

The oceans are seriously polluted. 80% of the human waste that ends up floating in the ocean are plastics that are causing a huge damage on the ecosystem and thus, affecting one of the most important food sources of our planet. According to plasticbank.org, 46,000 pieces of plastic are floating in each square mile on the sea, which kill 100,000 sharks, turtles, dolphins and whales that ingest them every year.

The technology

The Seabin is an automated rubbish bin that absorbs floating plastic, oil, fuel, detergents and other kinds of waste form the surface of the ocean. It is designed for floating docks, marinas, private pontoons, residential lakes, harbors, water ways, ports and yatch clubs.

Here’s how it works:

schema_fonctionnement_EN

The stakeholders

  • Poeple that own, frequent or live in marinas, private pontoons, residential lakes, harbours, water ways, ports and yatch clubs.
  • Poralu Marine – Manufacturer and distributor of the product

Deployment

  • Pete Ceflinski was a product designer that realized the consequences of his job and quitted
  • He started the project with his surf mate Andrew Turton to clean up the floating waste for the ocean.
  • They designed the Seabin, which catches everything that floatates in the water
  • Pete and Andrew signed a partnership with Poralu Marine, an industrial global leader of aluminium facilities, which will start developing, manufacturing and distributing Seabins by the end of 2016.

Source: The Seabin Project: www.seabinproject.com