Green Energy from Human Kinetic Energy

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Problem: The Implications of Non-Renewable Energy

Non-renewable energy has become synonymous with dirty energy, harming both human health and the environment’s natural resources. For this reason, new forms of renewable energy are becoming more and more widely accepted and implemented.

Technology: POWERleap Harnesses Energy From Foot Steps!” by Jill Fehrenbacher

Introduced in 2007 at Metropolis Magazine’s Next Generation design competition, POWERleap is a floor tiling system that converts wasted energy from human foot traffic into electricity. POWERleap uses what is called piezoelectric technology, which describes the electric charge that accumulates in certain solid materials (such as crystals, certain ceramics, and biological matter such as bone, DNA and various proteins) in response to applied mechanical stress. This, combined with a highly sophisticated circuitry system, can create electricity. This form of electricity has huge potential, considering there are areas with major foot traffic, like 5th Avenue or even a dance club, both of which could generate large amounts of electricity.

Stakeholders:

POWERleap INC.

POWERleap engineers/designers

Technological partners

Investors

Companies/Buildings that install the technology

Implementation:

In order to implement this technology on a large-scale, a number of investors need to be introduced

Since the technology is still in the beginning stages, it will need to reach out to small-scale partners, for example, schools, gyms, etc. that are looking to implement something like POWERleap in their facilities to promote physical activity and, as an after-thought, electricity.

Create a local (later national) campaign promoting the use of POWERleap in commercial building steps and other large areas.

Sources:

http://inhabitat.com/powerleap-harnesses-energy-from-foot-steps/

http://www.inhabitots.com/powerleap-harnesses-energy-from-little-feet/

http://www.explainthatstuff.com/piezoelectricity.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Himalayan Hydropower and Gross National Happiness (GNP)

Green Power Development Project – Construction of Dagachhu Hydropower Development in Bhutan

1) The Technology In Use ===  Hydroelectric Power Generation

The tiny nation of Bhutan, nestled high in the Himalayan Mountains, is poised to become an energy superpower.  Its prime position between two populous and growing nations – China and India – means it has the opportunity to utilize vast natural resources of flowing water and cutting edge technology of hydroelectric dams.  In a quest to attract clean, green and sustainable businesses, the nation continues to construct mega dams including:

Tala hydroelectric project (2007): located on the Wangchu River; gravity dam technology generates 3.821 GWh power solely for India and is delivered through transmission lines.

Chhukha hydroelectric project (1970s): located on the Wangchhu River; gravity dam technology generates 1.700 GWh.

Kurichhu hydroelectric project (2001): located on the Kuri Chhu River; gravity dam technology generates 0.379 GWh.

Basochhu hydroelectric project (Plant I & Plant II, 1997-2004): located near Wangdue Phodrang; dam technology generates 0.334 GWh.

Dagachhu hydroelectric project (Feb. 2015): located on Dagachhu River; gravity dam technology generates power for India.  First cross-border CDM of the UNFCCC.

Buhtan

2) The Sustainability Problem ===

Population:  China and India represent 20% and 17% of the world’s population, respectively.  At the current growth rate, India is expected to surpass China in the next few decades.

Economic Growth: As more people in India rise out of poverty, per capita energy consumption increases.

Clean Energy: Coal, kerosene and wood burning are the common methods of energy generation in poor households and small villages where electricity is not available. Hydroelectric power is a renewable energy source which does not emit harmful GHGs.

Ecological Preservation: Harnessing hydro electric power while maintaining national commitment to environmental sustainability.

3) The Technology Stakeholders ===

Contractors (designers, workers, operators)

Suppliers of component parts

Government of Bhutan

India Consumers

Individual residents/consumers

Bhutan Utility subsidiary

India Utility distributor

4) Process for Technology Implementation ===

Identify needs of India consumers/population

Determine economic efficiency/profitability; cost of tech vs ROI

Educate/Inform Bhutan residents of impact on natural environment

Monitor energy output from plant and consumption in India

Foster collaboration between nations under multilateral organization

Share new technology and best practices