Protecting the oceans through information sharing

coral-reef-1024x682-1024x6821) Oceans cover three-quarters of the Earth’s surface, contain 97 % of the Earth’s water, feed over a billion people and over three billion people depend on marine and coastal biodiversity for their livelihoods. (UN) Unfortunately, oceans and the species that depend on them— including humans—face an uncertain future. The combined effects of overfishing, poorly managed resource extraction, serial depletion of marine species and warming waters have contributed to the collapse of 70% of the world’s most productive fisheries, the loss of a third of the world’s coral reefs, 90 percent of the oceans’ top predators(WCS).  Illegal fishing and poorly manage resource extraction represent a significant problem in fisheries. (Mission Blue)

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2) Vessel monitoring systems, together with satellite tracking and machine learning allow to create transparency in the seafood supply chain, promoting sustainability.

Many initiatives such as Global Fishing Watch, Project Eyes on the Sea and TransparentSea. org use the data of Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS) and Automatic Identification Signals (AIS) from ships at sea, and corroborates the information with satellite images. That information is then processed with artificial intelligence tools to distinguish individual vessel tracks and identify when the vessels are fishing based on their movements fleets to understand their activities and impacts. Finally, most of this information is being shared for free. This enables to share information about where fishing activity is happening and has happened. For both, monitoring and conservation purposes, the former being relevant for law enforcement and later for research purposes.

The sharing of this type of information is important for efficient decision making, revealing where, when, and how much fishing occurs can help decision makers develop informed policy as well as strategic management and enforcement programs that create sustainable fisheries and reduce Illegal Unregulated and Unreported fishing (IUU).

“Developing datasets and analyses of global fishing activity can support research on ecology, the environment and human interaction with the ocean.  Global Fish Project

3) This technology could be deployed by policymakers, resource managers and in general all decision makers.

Conservation Organizations and NGOs can use this information to support campaigns to reduce impacts of fishing on the ocean, revealing fishing activity and pressuring officials and industry for changes that will improve sustainability on the oceans.

Industry Members could create and create premium markets and use this tool for fishers and seafood suppliers to verify how and where their products are caught.

Researchers could use this datasets and analyses of global fishing activity to support research on ecology, the environment and human interaction with the ocean.

The beauty of open source data sharing is that the application can be very diverse and varies between different stakeholders.

4) The next steps to deploy this technology is to share best practices in order to create awareness of the possible impacts of enabling data sharing could have, since the information is already public and for free.

Replacing the conventional small-format plastic packaging with edible and biodegradable material (seaweed)

  1. Sustainability Problem: Reducing plastic waste is a dilemma. It is something that most consumers want to do but find it hard to do so. That is because plastic is readily available, cheap, convenient and durable. Now, an Indonesian-based startup has come up with a delicious and nutritious solution to help reduce our dependence on this environmental hazard.
  2. Using seaweed as raw material, Evoware was able to come up with an eco-solution for problems concerning plastic waste. Evoware’s bioplastic products are eco-friendly, biodegradable and even edible and healthy for human beings. This will not just impact the environment but also for the livelihood of Indonesia’s seaweed farmers. Some benefits of bioplastics:
    • Food that works as flexible packaging
    • Has the same function as plastic packaging, plus it dissolves in warm water & is biodegradable
    • Shelf life: 2 years, without preservatives
    • Contains high fiber, vitamins and minerals
    • Maintains shore cleanliness
    • Improve seaweed farmer’s wellbeing and income

Sources:

Indonesian company Evoware makes edible seaweed packaging | Daily Mail Online

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4969030/Indonesian-company-Evoware-makes-edible-seaweed-packaging.html

Evoware Hopes to Reduce Plastic Waste With Edible Seaweed Wrappers and Ello Jello Cups | Dogo News

https://www.dogonews.com/2017/10/8/evoware-hopes-to-reduce-plastic-waste-with-edible-seaweed-wrappers-and-ello-jello-cups

Ecolution for your future | Evoware

http://www.evoware.id/

  1. Stakeholders:
    • Retailers
    • Fast food chains
    • Hospitality industries
    • Food & Beverage industries
    • Consumers all over the world
    • Waste Management Facilities
  2. Next steps:
    • Invest more on advertising and outreach
    • Engage with multiple stakeholders to start a movement
    • Innovate further by introducing new products/alternatives and concepts

 

By: Timothy Wiranata

UNI: tw2618

Comment on World’s first “negative emissions” plant :

“A very innovative technology indeed. Again, such ideas will always stumble upon large cost and scalability. And the fact that it needs a carbon-neutral plant to build upon means that it still needs further research since many power plants around the world are still not carbon-neutral.”

 

Denim Made out of Ocean Plastic

Bionic_Yarn_Pharrell_G_Star_Raw_For_The_Oceans_Denim_Recycle_Plastic_Sustainable_Principles_CFADC_Superego_Clothiers_3_grande

Problem: Plastics in the Oceans

Today, the Earth’s oceans are littered with millions of tons of plastic, wreaking havoc on animal and plant life in the water. This does not only affect the wildlife, but humans who rely on them for food and or business

Technology: “How a Pair of Jeans Could Save our Planet’s Plastic-Choked Oceans” by Issie Lapowsky

New York City-based startup, Bionic Yarn, has created a way to make fabric from recycled ocean plastic and turn it into denim products. The products are woven with some nine tons of ocean plastic inside. One of the company’s yarns is FLX, which is is made completely of recovered plastic. Their patented technology heats and spins together dozens of RPET strands to make new and improved yarn

Stakeholders:

Bionic Yarn tech engineers/designers

Technological partners

Design Collaborators

Fashion designers

Clothing retailers

Customers

Implementation:

In order to implement this technology on a large-scale, a number of investors need to be introduced

Fashion designers must begin to use the technology to introduce the innovation to the public and encourage its usage down the supply chain i.e. factories and low-end designers/retailers.  For example, Bionic Yarn has partnered with celebrity/designer, Pharrell Williams, who uses it in his G-Star Raw collections

The company should start a campaign marketing the technology to high-end textile suppliers, proving that this material can be recycled and high quality

Sources:

http://www.wired.com/2014/08/bionic-yarns/

http://www.bionicyarn.com/

https://www.g-star.com/en_us