Agua Nueva(Wastewater

Sustainability Problem: Water

Wastewater: “wastewater treatment as a water use because it is so interconnected with the other uses of water. Much of the water used by homes, industries, and businesses must be treated before it is released back to the environment. “

Technology Solution Agua Nueva

  • Lower cost and more efficient
  • Better quality of the water treated
  • It uses generation of ultra-filtering and microfiltering membranes
  • Biological treatment of wastewater to be able to use for watering

Stakeholders

  • Public
  • Wastewater processing companies
  • Government
  • Irrigation

Deployment/Implementation

  • Provide to the farmlands throughout the United States
  • It can help water shortages
  • Redirect the water previously used for irrigation to areas in need of water supply
  • Can reduce the water bill for the residence and farmland for the surrounding areas

Sources

https://www.acciona.us/sustainability/innovation/water-technologies/

https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/wastewater-treatment-water-use?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects

Membrane Bioreactors in Beer Production and Water Waste Management

Emily Tregidgo – emt2179

1) Sustainability Problem: Water, waste, emissions, safety and health

An average brewery uses 7 to 10 gallons of water to produce 1 gallon of beer1. Water is used as both an ingredient in beer and in its production, and wastewater is produced as a result of operations. Both the water intensity of production and the wastewater associated with it pose sustainability questions and concerns.

2) Sustainability Technology: BlueCycle MBR (membrane bioreactor)

Cambrian and The Florida Brewery Partner to Reduce Costs and CO2 Emissions

  • Distributed wastewater treatment and resource recovery solutions provider Cambrian is partnering with Florida’s second oldest operational brewery, The Florida Brewery, to deploy Cambrian’s BlueCycle MBR technology. The technology is intended to replace the need for high-strength wastewater disposal systems, and to reduce CO2 output by ~254 metric tons per year. There are also anticipated cost savings associated with the technology.
  • BlueCycle MBR is an aerobic digester that removes water pollutants from the wastewater and its use facilitates water reuse compliant with Title 22 requirements (water recycling regulations). 
  • Anheuser-Busch, Dr. Pepper, and Anchor Brewing Company are among other companies that are using Cambrian’s water reuse solutions.

3) Stakeholders

  • Cambrian
  • The Florida Brewery (operational team)
  • Other beverage companies (both those that use these technologies and those that do not)
  • Regulatory bodies (to ensure compliance with Title 22 and other legislation) 

4) The First Three Steps in Deploying This Technology

  • Assess the impact of the technology at The Florida Brewery
  • Market the cost savings and sustainability benefits the technology provides to other beverage companies
  • Conduct regulatory research to ensure the product is still compliant with the requisite legislation

Sources:

1The thirsty business of beer: How breweries are confronting the industry’s water problem

Micro Fuel Cell, generating electricity of wastewater

fuel-cell1) According to the UN Water at a global level, 80% of wastewater produced is discharged into the ecosystem untreated, causing widespread water pollution. Wastewater treatment is not only relevant to reduce environmental pollution but also to ensure drinking water supply, around 1.8 billion people use a contaminated source of drinking water. Even though there are numerous processes that can be used to clean up wastewaters depending on the type and extent of contamination, the most common barriers are the affordability of these technologies and their energy consumption.

2) Microbial Fuel Cells

Technology: A microbial fuel cell (MFC), is a bio-electrochemical system that drives an electric current by using bacteria and mimicking bacterial interactions found in nature. “The direct conversion of organic matter to electricity using bacteria” Logan.  These electrochemical cells are constructed using either a bioanode and/or a biocathode. Inside the fuel cell,  anaerobic bacteria releases electrons in an oxygen-free environment. The electrons flow to an anode and then into a circuit to cathodes in a separate chamber on the outside of the membrane.

Potential: MFCs use energy very efficiently than standard, in theory, an MFC is capable of energy efficiency far beyond 50%. Nonetheless, MFCs are only attractive for power generation applications that require only low power, therefore the amount of electricity generated will not compare will a power plant, or even cover the entire processing facility, but it can offset the energy used to clean the water. “The energy we don’t consume is more important than the electricity we might produce” Logan.

Constraints: The fuel cell is ideal for wastewater with a high concentration in organic material, mostly wastewater from agriculture and food processing rather than municipalities. This technology has had interesting advances in the proof of concept but it is still has a  wide range of opportunity to increase processing volumes until it can be implemented at a large scale.

3) Municipal, industrial and agricultural water treatment facilities, will be able to increase the efficiency and reduce the sludge by applying this technology. Furthermore, this technology will enable small-scale decentralized water treatment facilities, owned by either farmers or communities.

4) The next steps to deploy this technology would be to increase processing volumes until it can be implemented at a large scale. Moreover, to evaluate the possibility to automatize the small-scale facilities to reduce operation and maintenance efforts to expand the user market.

 

 

 

 

Handy Pod Toilets: Wetland plants naturally filter human waste

Problem:

Floating villages, mostly in South East Asia, generally flush their waste directly into the water beneath them. As these residents depend entirely on the water they live on (e.g. fishing, bathing etc.), this discharge has grave effects on health due to bacterial diseases.

 

Technology/Article: 

Handy Pods, developed by Wetlands Work, use local plants to filter sewage waste prior to releasing it back into the water. The waste is first filtered through local plants that soak up waste toxins, like E.coli, up to 99.999% without chemicals or power. The remaining cleaned water is then free to be released back into the lake.

An additional benefit is that this technology can be at low cost and using local materials.

This project has already been deployed in Prek Toal, a floating village on a lake in Cambodia, that is home to roughly 100,000 people.

Article: http://inhabitat.com/floating-toilets-filter-human-waste-in-cambodia-naturally-via-wetland-plants/

 

Stakeholders:

  • Wetlands Work
  • Investors
  • NGOs
  • Floating village communities

 

Implementation:

  • Although cheap, Wetlands Work will need investors to raise capital to have this technology deployed in various other floating village communities
  • NGOs will need to implement this technology on the ground (teach communities how to build it, how to maintain it, the health and environmental benefits etc.)
  • Ideally, implementation would target lakes/areas where this technology has already been partially implemented because even if some villages on a given lake have the technology, but others don’t, then they will not get the full health and environmental benefits that come with such filtration.